St. Joe's Farm

St. Joe's Farm

This was a long week. We had temperatures in the mid-90s, some days real feel was 100+, and working on a farm in those conditions is not exactly fun. That being said, even though I was only at the farm for a week, I definitely learned a few things.

1. Dirt is your friend. Love it and it will love you back. (Having said that, shower every day.)

2. Bees really aren't so bad if you hear one and just paralyze your body so you don't move whatsoever until the coast is clear (even if it lands on you, simply say, "I am not a flower you can't pollinate me, bee, please go away"). Worked about 50% of the time.

3. Weeding is hard and makes me heavily reconsider if I ever want to garden. 

4. Although you're never completed with farm work, you actually feel like you're accomplishing things when you've planted a whole row of beets or weeded the entire carrot patch.

5. I definitely come from a softer generation and was not raised doing back-breaking labor; in conclusion, I'm sort of a wimp.

6. There are a lot of different kinds of bugs that live in the soil, and hornworms (who like to eat tomatoes) make a big squish when you step on them. :(

7. Baby bunnies are cute but will eat your cherry tomato plants like it's their last day on earth.

8. Selling food at the farmer's market you harvested the day before is really amazing. And when you make a recipe from the harvest to give people to sample -- even cooler.

9. SUNSCREEN ERR DAY ALL DAY.

10. Everyone should work on a farm at least once in their life. Even if it's just volunteering for a day, there's something special about connecting with you food in it's natural form. Seeing tomatoes ripen on the vine, pulling garlic from the ground, or planting food in neat little rows, it all has meaning. It was also great to see the beauty of food in all it's different shapes and sizes, not just the cookie cutter produce from the grocery store. It also gives you insight into the real price of food... I definitely felt like the tomatoes we harvested took a lot more work than their selling price.

Eat local when you can, organic too if possible, and remember that every food purchase you make is a vote for what you are looking for in the food system.

 

AIHFS: WIC & Special Populations

AIHFS: WIC & Special Populations

Dietetic Internship Orientation

Dietetic Internship Orientation